Unruly launches Trusted Video Marketplaces in Indonesia and Philippines

SINGAPORE – October 1st, 2018 – Unruly has partnered with several top tier publishers to launch The Philippines’ and Indonesia’s first-ever premium publisher marketplaces for outstream video ad inventory.

The UnrulyX Trusted Philippines Marketplace and the UnrulyX Trusted Indonesia Marketplace, both available via UnrulyX, will be the place to collectively buy desktop and mobile outstream video inventory across all top tier publishers in each market, guaranteeing premium environments for advertisers, with a potential audience of 55m million unique users.

Partners in the UnrulyX Trusted Philippines Marketplace include The Inquirer, The Philippines Star, Summit Media, Fox Asia, MSN, GMA Network, Rappler and OLX Philippines, to offer advertisers access to over 200 million video impressions per month. Partner publishers in the UnrulyX Trusted Indonesia Marketplace include Kompas, IDN Times, Fox Asia, MSN, Tempo, Brilio, OLX Indonesia and Perform Group, resulting in access to over half a billion video impressions per month.

The marketplace aims to meet the increasing demands of the ad industry for high quality outstream video ad formats on trusted, brand safe sites with the ease and precision targeting of programmatic buying. Quality of views will be independently verified by MOAT. Advertisers will be able to access this scaled, premium video opportunity through a dedicated Unruly team.

The collaboration comes after increasing research shows that premium sites deliver the most impactful digital ad campaigns – including recent research by Newsworks, Neuro-Insight and AOP that found quality editorial environments are more effective in driving long term memory encoding and engagement, than social sites. Another study by Newsworks and GroupM in July this year found that consumers spent 17% longer viewing ads on premium sites.

Unruly’s APAC VP Business Development, Haifaa Daw said: “Unruly has identified a need in the marketplace for brands who want to elevate the environments they are running in. Given our relationships with premium local publishers, we’re excited to provide the technology to facilitate and lead strategic industry initiatives such as this one.”

Phil Townend, Chief Commercial Officer Unruly APAC, said: “We’re extremely proud to be working closely with these flagship publishers across Indonesia and the Philippines.  Neuroscience and advanced measurement techniques show that consumer engagement levels are heightened within premium editorial environments and these video marketplaces offer both cost efficiency and engagement to drive business outcomes for advertisers. Our Trusted Marketplaces solve the problem of scarcity of genuinely premium, verifiably brand safe and viewable video at scale.”

Moris Rusmanto, VP of Digital Sales Kompas Gramedia said “There is a clear demand from advertisers for high quality video inventory and greater media collaboration to make buying at scale easier and more effective. The UnrulyX Trusted Marketplaces are a significant step towards giving advertisers access to some of the very best video ad formats online, and providing more certainty around brand safety and viewability. We look forward to testing this new proposition and working with the industry to deliver the best in digital advertising.”

Inquirer Interactive’s Chief Operating Officer, Gary Libby said: “With the introduction of The UnrulyX Trusted Marketplaces we have created a safe medium for advertisers who want to access verified inventory at scale. It is an encouraging development from the industry that will give advertisers access to quality audiences on one single platform.”

Advertisers can email Unruly’s commercial team at [email protected] to access The UnrulyX Trusted Philippines and Indonesia Marketplaces.

On this week’s episode of the Unruly Home Show Live Leo Bernard talks to Honda’s Marketing Manager, Benjamin Neu, about their robotic lawnmower, and how connected devices are branching out from the home into the garden!

Check out previous episodes of the Unruly Home Show Live.

Not sure what to see at Advertising Week New York? With so many venues, speakers and topics, it can be overwhelming! We’ve broken down the three areas which continue to dominate discussions within the ad industry. We’ve also highlighted the talks we are looking forward to around each topic.

Why are people still talking about Blockchain?

It feels like we have been talking about blockchain forever, and that’s because we have. Ten years in fact! The first blockchain was conceptualised back in 2008 to serve as the public transaction ledger of the cryptocurrency bitcoin. It’s come a long way since then and many people believe that the technology will revolutionise numerous markets including the advertising sector.

With problems of fraud, complicated supply chains and lack of control over data privacy, many believe that blockchain could help to bring some transparency back into digital advertising. They believe this will be done replacing the current online model with one in which companies have more control over campaign performance tracking, and ensuring equitable outcomes.

Whatever your thoughts are on the technology it doesn’t look like it’s going anywhere. There are lots of discussions and talks planned around how it could disrupt digital advertising next week.

What to see at Advertising Week New York

Out of all the talks on blockchain this year, we’re especially looking forward hearing Venture Capitalist Bill Tai’s Blockchain Crash Course. This is happening on Thursday afternoon on the IBM Watson stage.

How much longer do I have to wait until machines can think for me?

AI is advancing all the time and Google recently revealed Duplex. This gives their Assistant the ability to make calls on your behalf. It can also book appointments for you like your haircut, or a table at your favourite restaurant! Scary I know!

Boston based emotional intelligence company Affectiva are also working on software which will allow AI to read facial expressions. This will open up the possibility of assistants being able to make recommendations to us without us needing to say a word to them!

AI robots

More and more companies are creating voice assistants, and piggybacking on the tech of Alexa, Google or Messenger to create specialised assistants. A good example of this is Diageo’s “Open the bar”, or Estée Laude offering nutritional advice, where you have the dialogue with the brand, not Alexa.

Our Futurist, Elena Corchero recently wrote an article around how AI and future tech will change the way brands communicate with consumers. She believes that if brands are not careful they will easily get bypassed by other tech savvy competitors. AI will be a huge talking point at Advertising Week.

What to see at Advertising Week New York

After appearing on our Home Show Live, we are looking forward to hearing IV.AI’s views on the impact of AI on different industries. We are also looking forward to IBM kicking off the week with their ‘Survival of the Fittest in an AI World’ talk.

Is retail dead yet?

shopping mall

Over the past year the conversation around retail has changed. Many thought that physical stores would eventually shut down and everything would move online. Although we have seen a lot of store closures and retail chains disappearing in the US, many retailers have embraced the digital era. They are finding new ways to attract customers with combined on and offline advertising campaigns.

Rather than seeing the online space as separate to the physical store, many retailers are combining their approach and using digital to attract customers to their stores. Amazon opened their first physical store in the US last year. It allows customers to shop by simply taking products off the shelf and charging them directly rather than having to queue at a till.

The online US lingerie company Adore Me opened their first physical stores last year. After seeing the benefits of having a combined on and offline presence, they have announced that they plan to open another 200-300 stores in the US in the next five years.

As retailers continue to see the benefits of a combined on and offline approach, they are looking for their ad campaigns to follow suit. Expect a lot of conversations around the benefits and drawbacks of combining online and offline advertising in campaigns.

What to see at Advertising Week New York

This year there are a number of talks on this subject. We are especially looking forward to hearing SET’s CEO Alasdair Lloyd-Jones on why he believes the retail apocalypse is a myth.

To find out how we could help improve your ad campaigns check out our offering.

If you are going to be at Advertising Week and would like to chat with one of our team get in touch.

We’ll also be live tweeting from Advertising Week so follow us to stay up to date with the latest news!

Unruly Futurist Elena Corchero talks about her experience at DMEXCO earlier this month, the future of advertising, and how to avoid brand bypass.

This year a lot of the conversations we had were around the future of advertising and the rise of ambient tech. We also spoke about the growth of data produced by humans, and how it’s doubling every year.

Everyone knows that voice technology and voice shopping is on the rise. However, I was surprised about the number of brands who hadn’t considered the implications of brand bypass.

Brand bypass in AI

Companies are using voice assistants, and piggybacking on the tech of Alexa, Google or Messenger to create specialised assistants. A good example of this is Diageo’s “Open the bar”, or Estée Laude offering nutritional advice, where you have the dialogue with the brand, not Alexa. This is one way for brands to avoid the brand bypass.

It’s a big issue. I spoke to a lot of people about the new B2B: bot to bot. In the future new AI applications will take over interaction, negotiation and even advertising which will lead to the elimination of choice for consumers. Just think it through: the first brand you choose comes into your connected home, and there are going to be many barriers to switch that brand out for another.

Imagine your fridge has image recognition. It knows what brands you have on the shelves so when you run out of juice, the fridge and home AI reorder the same juice for delivery. So when are you going to switch brands? It’s going to take significant energy to get in the way of that bot to bot transition.

Brand bypass in voice

Another example is that we will order through voice but not mention a specific brand. This means our AI will default to our usual choice. Appliances are partnering with cleaning brands so they can already come pre-programmed to order specific chemicals such as detergent or dishwasher tablets.

Finish, smart dishwasher

It’s clear we need to understand how to use these technologies to create stronger brand and emotional connections, and also how these technologies can allow people to switch brands when they know something better is available.

Brand bypass in image recognition

Brand bypass is also an issue in image recognition. Google had an enormous stand at DMEXCO showing image recognition technology. I checked it out and it was a surprise to me to see how many brands had not considered the impact of this. Not least the value of the data which the image search platforms will generate. They will know exactly what people are searching for and buying to a highly accurate level. This sort of data can impact the manufacturing chain. Pinterest gets around 600,000 visual searches a month, so consumers are ahead of brands on this!

All the ambient technologies were on show at DMEXCO. For me, voice is where the action is. Primarily because the car will drive voice adoption. New cars are increasingly voice enabled, so when you leave the car and don’t have that assistance, you’re going to miss it!avoiding brand bypass in voice activated cars

Ambient tech awareness

Strangely, as I talked people through the implications of voice, AR and AI technologies, the most common question I was asked was “is this out now?”

Many people, senior brand marketers among them, didn’t realise how these ‘futuristic’ things were actually here now, even in a mature market like Germany. And where there was some awareness of ambient tech, there was very little first-hand experience.

It reaffirmed the role the Home plays in telling the story of ambient technology, which is essential if brands are going to build effective consumer relationships and deliver effective, relevant and timely advertising. The future of advertising is already here!

Unruly futurists Elena Corchero and Leo Bernard

Find out more about our connected home, and book in a tour with one of our Futurists.

We are bringing MMS Programmatic to Auckland on September the 27th and to Sydney on October the 4th.

The summits are designed to change the way you think about modern marketing and programmatic innovations. The events will help you uncover new trends, technologies, and case studies to propel your strategy further.

Our Programmatic Lead for Australia, Heath Irving, has outlined five questions which he believes will shape the conversations at MMS Programmatic 2018.

1 – How do we increase trust in programmatic?

Trust has been a key theme this year and you can’t blame marketers for being wary. All you have to do is look at the trade press and it seems there is a new issue nearly every day. From fake news, to brand safety scares, to misreporting of metrics, and most recently shady auction mechanics. Because of this we need to ask how can we be more transparent so brands feel comfortable in knowing end to end where their money is going? What role do the big tech platforms play in enabling higher levels of transparency? Where do agency groups fall into this debate?  

2 – What lies ahead in Australia for mergers and acquisitions?

The abolishment of Australian media regulations which had predated the internet, and as many argued shackled local media companies and inhibited their ability to achieve the scale necessary to compete with foreign tech giants, has led to the sale of legacy print giant Fairfax by broadcaster Channel 9 who will now operate under the Nine banner. This will raise interesting questions at MMS Programmatic Sydney including; what will rival news companies look to do? Will this really mean less share for the big two? Is consolidation really good for the industry?

3 – What is standing in the way for brands to really adopt Connected TV?

smart TV

Heralded as the catalyst to finally bring real investment over from traditional broadcast into digital, two years in and we are still scratching our heads as to why this hasn’t happened yet. I am interested to hear what the key barriers are for brands. How important is having a universal currency to trade on? Is Nielsen’s new all screen offering really going to be a bulletproof solution? How important is being able to manage frequency across different formats? And finally, in terms of addressability what are the main challenges in our local market?

4 – How are brands faring pulling programmatic in-house?

At MMS Programmatic, I’m interested to hear about the motivations of brands that are planning or have pulled their programmatic trading in-house. I also want to compare the reasoning of those that have decided not to. First of all we need to consider supply chain management, technology and vendor selection. We also need to think about data housing and activating, ad serving, and also the role that consultancies might play in this space.

5 – Blockchain – revolutionise the biddable market or just media hype?

There’s been a lot of discussion recently on auction mechanics and how brands can get more transparency from the tech giants. Would trading through a blockchain enabled platform be a better way forward? How would it look using blockchain to support contracts and the reconciliation process of digital advertising? Are we at a stage where this is could implemented, and if so who are the leaders in this space?

Head here to find out more about MMS Programmatic in Sydney.

Head here to find out more about MMS Programmatic in Auckland.

If you can’t make either of the summits but would like to stay up to date with what’s happening at both, follow us on Twitter.

This week on the Unruly Home Show Live Elena Corchero chats to Neil Stubbings, Managing Director at IV.AI, who shows us how brands can use messaging platforms to communicate with customers in new ways. He also demonstrates how Netflix have been using their tech to communicate with consumers and recommend content depending on their mood, and how Smashbox are using it to help consumers try different types of makeup.

Check out previous episodes of the Unruly Home Show Live.

Our EMEA Managing Director, Jason Trout, talks about his experience of being on the mechanics of publisher monetization panel at ATS London.

This week I was part of a panel at ATS London 2018, which was focused on the mechanics of publisher monetization. I was joined by the Digital Sales and Innovation Director for The Telegraph Karen Eccles, Damon Reeve from the Ozone Project and Jourdain Casale, VP of Global Intelligence at Index Exchange. 

It was a really interesting panel to be a part of. Especially as publisher monetization continues to be a key talking point within our industry, and a key focus area for us as a business. We began the discussion by talking about how publisher monetization strategies have changed over the past 12 months.

New marketplaces

At Unruly we have seen first hand how premium publishers are slowly pulling away from tackling their competition individually, to a more collective approach. This has led to alliances and JV’s such as Ozone, the Verified Marketplace and the Premium Sport Marketplace. These marketplaces are becoming more and more popular among advertisers and it’s easy to see why when you look at the stats. The Verified Marketplace’s UK reach alone is over 39.4 million, and the average viewability of ads is 78.6%, which is 15.1% higher than the MOAT benchmark.

The conversation then moved to the shift in focus from open market-places, to a more closed and controlled market, and whether this presents an opportunity for publishers to develop closer relationships with advertisers.

I’ve heard buyers say for several years now that they want to transition from managed to programmatic ad delivery. At Unruly we’ve seen this trend play out firsthand but we’ve also seen an increase from the buy-side requesting guarantees in their programmatic deals.

As new models mature, like Programmatic Guaranteed (PG), you will see closer relationships forged between programmatic buyers and publishers. I believe this is a natural progression as models like PG closely mirror that of traditional IO and direct-sold business, where both buyer and seller negotiate directly.

consuming news on an ipad

PMPs versus programmatic

We then moved on to look at the scalability challenges with PMPs versus programmatic and automated guaranteed, and how they could be overcome. In my opinion, PMPs in their current guise will continue to offer both buyers and sellers an environment away from the open exchange to practice control. That said, we are seeing a growing trend from buyers to secure guarantees in their PMPs. This has resulted in the increase of programmatic guaranteed features we are seeing released from both buy and sell-side vendors.

When we talk about scale, traditional PMPs have always struggled to meet this requirement as there has never been a commitment from publishers to send volumes. At the same time, buyers have lacked commitments to spend. Programmatic guaranteed is evolving at exactly the right point in time. We know the holding costs are under immense pressure to become 100% programmatic and at Unruly, we believe PG sits at the intersection of the IO and legacy PMP. We expect it to be the catalyst to increased spends in programmatic this year.

Publisher monetization opportunities

Finally we touched upon new monetization opportunities, and what the tech layer is doing to help and support publishers with this. I believe we need to first understand the value of a publisher buying, rather than licensing. In some scenarios M&A is the logical path, that said, very few of the publishers I have spoken to actually have the appetite to start spending hundreds of millions on tech and data assets when they are fully aware that in the age of GDPR and social networks it is data, context, and service that help you to truly differentiate, not ad or martech ownership.

To find out more about the Verified Marketplace and our other offerings check out our products page. Alternatively get in touch with one of our team.

You can also keep up to date with the latest on publisher monetization and other adtech trends by following us on Twitter.

Unruly insights from ATS London

We’re carrying out a set of interviews with our ProDev team to find out what a day in the life of an Unruly developer looks like. This week we sat down with our Agile Coach Qaiser Mazhar to chat about his agile journey, becoming a father, and his love for gardening!

Q: Hi Qaiser, first of all, could you introduce yourself and tell us a bit about what you do?

QM: Hey, I’m Qaiser Mazhar and I’m the Agile Coach at Unruly. I’ve been here for almost six months. I coach teams and individuals at Unruly to harness the benefits of agile principles and practices through a variety of ways including games, workshops, catch ups and meetings. I’ve also been known to write a line or two of code!

Q: How did you end up here?

QM: I found out about Unruly a long time ago when I attended XP meetups at the old offices. I used to also see Rachel Davies, Unruly’s former Agile Coach, at conferences and events.

I heard about the Agile Coaching role at Unruly through a headhunter. I was due to start at a different company shortly after hearing about the role, but when I found out that it was for Unruly, and that Steve Hayes had recently become the new CTO, I knew this was an opportunity too good to pass up! Steve worked at Goldman Sachs around the same time as me, which is where I discovered that Steve was an agilista.

Working at a company where the founders built agile into its DNA is really rare. I’m excited to see what we can achieve!

Q: Tell us about life before Unruly…

QM: I’ve always been a big techie at heart! I started my career off as a software engineer at Goldman Sachs where I helped the company navigate the 2008 financial crisis using XP and lean practices.

From Goldman Sachs I moved to Rightmove where I worked in a split role as a Technical Lead and Agile Coach. I helped Rightmove transform their legacy tech and practices so that they were fit for the future. This was one of the most challenging, but rewarding experiences of my career to date. Echoing Rightmove parlance: in Agile, I had found my happy!

With success in digital transformation, I decided to take on a bigger challenge and so I joined Marks and Spencer as an Agile Coach and Delivery Lead. There was always amazing value to generate from supporting and growing multiple development teams, to improving communications between departments and supporting leadership teams. It wasn’t just any job, it was an M&S job!

Q: You’ve been on quite a journey! What draws you to this type of work?

QM: Working in a place where you can take a real-world problem, and turn it into an opportunity to create something that can improve the lives of millions of people on a daily basis is something I’ve been consistently drawn to in my career.

Moving from a Developer to an Agile Coach was a difficult choice but being able to support individuals, teams, and the wider business with their short, medium and long term challenges is incredibly rewarding. Working with everyone to cultivate a safe and sustainable environment where all Unrulies have a clear purpose, a pathway to mastery in the things we do, and the autonomy to get on with the task at hand is a continual process of improvement that is so varied that I am always learning and growing.

Q: How would you explain your job to your grandparents?

QM: I help my friends at work to discover and experiment with things that could help them work together better, delight our customers more often, and grow as a company in the long term, whilst having fun along the way.

Q: Tell us about something you’ve learnt while working here?

QM: I’ve learnt that not every fridge in the office is what it seems! (Editor’s note: Qaiser’s right, some of fridges have special properties!)

Q: Do you put your skills to work outside the office?

QM: I’m a London Java Community Associate, which is the steering group for the largest Java community in Europe.

Q: Got any side hustles?

QM: I used to have a side hustle in the recruitment tech space before joining Unruly. Becoming a new father and the fast pace of my day job meant I had to put that to bed.

For fun, I am considering creating an open source android app that combines elements of multiple productivity techniques alongside agile and lean practices. It’s on my to do list!

Q: It’s the weekend: what are you doing?

QM: My wife and I spend most of our weekends running after our son at activities and events! I love catching up with friends and family over coffees and dinners, and at home we’re keen gardeners so we spend most weekends working on our veg plot.

Q: What kind of challenges do the developers at Unruly tackle?

QM: There are always so many great ideas that our developers could be working on. As we grow parts of our business, some of our teams focus around scaling up our services so we can meet the increasing demand for existing services. We have teams that are focussed on thinking about future opportunities in areas like machine learning and big data. Then there are others building new features in existing services to break into new markets. It’s all very exciting and I’m always blown away by the things our developers do in their 20% learning time too!

Q: What do you enjoy most about your job?

QM: Working at Unruly during a time of massive growth is really interesting as an agile coach. Helping our teams scale, but still retain agile values by figuring out new ways of collaborating, prioritising and delivering value is really fun.

Q: And finally, what music do you listen to whilst working?

QM: I’m usually working with other people around the office but when I do have my headphones on I’m listening to Chillstep.

Want to join the Unruly family? You’re in luck, we’re hiring! Check out our job page for the latest roles!

Meet some other members of the ProDev team!

In this week’s episode of the Unruly Home Show Live, Elena Corchero chats to Charlotte Morris and Jo Osborne, the founders of SkinNinja, an exciting new app that uses AI to allow consumers to be more informed about their personal care products. Charlotte and Jo demo the app, discuss the idea behind it, and how it helps consumers to make better decisions about the products they use.

The way retail exists today looks very different to how it did 10 years ago. With this in mind we decided it was time to rip up the rule book and explore new ways that retailers can engage with their customers, both in stores and online.

At our recent Trust Talks: Future of Retail event, we sat down and quizzed three experts from the retail space; Elena Corchero, Futurist at Unruly, Ricardo Varela, CEO and Founder of Localistico and Joshua McBain, Director of Consultancy at the Foresight Factory.

A recent report states that over the next 20 years, between 50% and 75% of transactions will be going globally through the Alibaba, Walmart and Amazon platforms. With this in mind, what opportunities are there for retailers to carve a niche as we see consumer behaviour is changing so greatly?

Joshua McBain (JM): The type of impact that these changes will have on different brands depends on their customer groups, and the type of loyalty that they invoke with their customers. The key thing to understand for brands in this space is what the impact is going to be on your brand vs other brands based on your type of loyalty, positioning, and what you sell.

Ricardo Varela (RV): If you look at Amazon, they have recently done a lot of work with the Whole Foods brand by bringing it into the digital space. Going forwards, brands are going to have to decide the best way to reach their consumers, whether that be through digital channels, through physical stores, or through a combined outreach.

Elena Corchero (EC): Looking to the future, I wonder whether Brexit will change the availability of people that work within the delivery space. I also think that driver-less cars will bring about a real change in terms of shipping costs for retailers.

Thinking about Amazon, Alibaba and Walmart, a huge part of their future growth will revolve around voice. How can you see voice helping other retailers, and what opportunities does it present to them that we aren’t currently thinking about?

EC: I believe the car is going to be the biggest driver of voice command over the coming years. Using voice commands to carry out actions whilst you are driving is a necessity compared to when you are at home, where you have the choice to use voice or type in the command to your phone.

The main way voice will impact retailers through car is via impulse purchases. If we think about KitKat, previously they relied on consumers who were away from the home seeing or hearing an advert, remembering it, and then going out of their way to find somewhere that sold it. Whereas now you can take instant action by saying add to basket whilst you are driving, and by the time you get home the KitKat might be there.  

JM: What I think is interesting is the innovations that Microsoft are leading on, which is allowing brands to tailor their tone of voice depending on what service it’s coming from. For example talking to your BMW should sound different than if you were to talk to your Amazon Echo. Consumer’s don’t expect every service to sound the same and many brands are now becoming aware of that, and are starting to act upon it.

If you are a global retailer, how are you able to consider new trends and technologies to engage with your customers at a local level?

RV: Working at a local level is extremely important within the retail sector. Looking at Morrisons as an example, they have created creches in their stores that are located in areas where a lot of families live. Apple also state that each of their stores are unique, and what is in each store is different depending on where it is based.

It’s also important to use the technologies we have to communicate with customers by letting them know what services are available to them. A lot of the time brands will offer additional services like an in store creche, but people will not know about it because the brand has not done a great job of communicating it to their local audience.

“Where marketing starts and e-commerce ends is becoming increasingly blurred”

Is there a way that advertising can add real value, and become part of the end to end consumer experience within the media space?

EC: At Unruly we are studying this within the Home. Over the past year we have learnt that one of the advantages of advertising through the IoT, through voice, and through immersive technologies like VR in the home is that it all becomes part of this ambient era of advertising. Going forward this will hopefully help consumers to see advertisements as adding value to their lives rather than seeing them as interruptions.

JM: Where marketing starts and e-commerce ends is becoming increasingly blurred and I believe that we will see this continue as big social channels like Snapchat and Instagram become more and more shoppable. Social channels will become a great way for brands to work on a much more personal level with their customers, and will give them the ability to personalise their products and prices depending on the customer they are targeting.

We are looking to a world where most services will become automated. My fridge will be able to scan my items and automatically replace them so that I never run out of anything. With this in mind, does that mean that retailers are in danger of becoming more like logistics companies?

EC: I think it’s an advantage as having all that data and machine learning will allow companies to know exactly how much stock they need to hold in different areas.

What is also exciting is the way that AI will work within these situations. For example with the fridge, it could recommend different recipes that it thinks you would like depending on the foods that you enjoy eating on a regular basis. In order to complete the recipes you may be required to order in new ingredients which then opens the door up to new food brands.  

This Q&A was held at Unruly’s Future of Retail event in London. To see any of the insightful presentations available from the event, click on any of the below links to check them out:

“Convenience vs. Experiential : The retail trend landscape in 2018”, Joshua McBain, Director of Consultancy, Foresight Factory

How to empower brands in the home of the future”, Elena Corchero, Futurist, Unruly

“How startups can predict the future of retail”, Justin Cross, Head of Blink UK, MediaCom, Ricardo Varela, Founder, Localistico, Stepan Lavrouk, Customer Engagement Manager, Gyana AI