Emotions run high in the new Elton John Lewis ad

They kept us waiting for what seemed like forever but the John Lewis & Partners’ Christmas ad is finally here!

The UK department store released their Christmas ad entitled Elton John Lewis this morning (Thursday 15). The UK chain kept the public waiting for longer than usual and changed a number of their storefront names from John Lewis to John in the lead up which built up the excitement even more.

This morning their ad was released to the world with mixed opinions. This year’s ad feels very different to anything they’ve done before. Years gone by have featured woodland creatures, penguins, and monsters, often with playful and youthful tones. This year was a step away from that, with the brand using the life of global pop star Elton John to tell their Christmas story.

The chain changed their name to John Lewis & Partners earlier this year so perhaps Elton John Lewis is a statement to the world that they are moving in a new direction, or maybe they just fancied a shake up of the traditional model they have stuck to for so long.

An emotional perspective

Our UnrulyEQ Insights team have given us their first impressions of the Elton John Lewis ad and what emotions they believe it evokes. They have also looked at how it compares on an emotional level to John Lewis & Partners Christmas ads from the past three years.

A clear trend across the past three years has been that of aiming for the relatable and the magic of Christmas; ‘Man On The Moon’ focused on loneliness around Christmas, ‘Buster The Boxer’ on the sheer joy of Christmas and ‘Moz The Monster’ on the experience of monsters under the bed, whilst bringing a loving Christmas attitude to the story.

Elton John Lewis on the other hand offers a complete change in focus and goes down the route of watching the life of a pop legend in rewind. The ad ends with him as a child getting his first piano for Christmas. It offers a clear depiction of the effect a gift can have on someone’s life. Receiving a piano  set the course of Elton John’s life and career, which turned out to be life-changing.

How does it compare?

Previous years’ focus on relatability has proved to drive a strong emotional response amongst viewers; tugging at the heartstrings by portraying the magic of Christmas through the innocent eyes of children. In contrast, even though Elton John Lewis is likely to be less applicable to the greater population, it is likely to drive strong pride evoked from depicting a national treasure such as Elton John. This is likely to be coupled with warmth from depicting not only Elton John’s extraordinary career, but also that he was once just a boy receiving a gift at Christmas.

John Lewis ad comparison

Even though many will find Elton John’s story emotional, there is likely to be a proportion of viewers who question the ad’s emphasis on Christmas. Furthermore, with the film ‘Rocket Man’ being released in the spring, which tells the story of Elton John’s life, some might query the promotional aspects of this ad.

Ultimately, with much anticipation, we are awaiting the true effects of Elton John Lewis which marks a new style of Christmas ad from the brand. We are expecting a strong but potentially polarising emotional response from the British people.

Check out our insights on some of the most popular Christmas ads from the past few years.

Find out more about our UnrulyEQ offering.

On 15th November our Associate Director of Strategic Sales Ella Gribben and VP of Insights Becky Waring will be talking at Mindshare’s Huddle 2018 along with the Visualogical team.

Huddle is a jam-packed event of intimate and no-holds-barred discussions about the future of media, and each year the event focusses on a different subject. This year the focus is on ‘The New Era of Influence’.

The session entitled ‘The Art of Science and Emotions’ will take participants on a journey that explores the different applications of emotional data and demonstrates how emotions provide the competitive edge in a brands media strategy, now and in the future.

From supercharging campaign effectiveness to creating visualisations of our subconscious, emotional data is the new secret sauce that marketers need to pay attention to.

Our expert panel will explore the different ways emotional data can be applied, and the art and science of emotions will be bought to life as the audience can test Unruly’s facial coding for themselves, or participate in Visualogical, and create a digital portrait of their subconscious!

The session will take place in area 62 at 12pm.

Check out the full agenda here.

On 6 November we kick off our next Trust Talks event in London. On a scale of 1-10, how excited are we to bring this event back to the UK? We reckon about 15! This edition of Trust Talks is focused on all things programmatic!

The programmatic advertising ecosystem can be a confusing place – so full of acronyms, vendors and platforms that it can be hard to know who (and what) you can trust. The issues of brand safety have dominated the headlines in recent times, and this is only becoming more of a concern as programmatic buying continues to scale.

In light of this we decided it was time to bring influential figures within the programmatic sphere in the UK together under one roof for the morning to discuss the problems and opportunities that programmatic is facing, and how we can work together as an industry to either solve or embrace them.

We will be hosting a number of panels throughout the morning to discuss and tackle some of the most prevalent issues and questions being asked across the programmatic model. Take a look below to find out who will be speaking, and what each panel will cover.

Trust Talks: The Great Programmatic Debate will be live streaming via the Unruly Facebook page from 9-12 on Tuesday 5th November!

09:10 – 09:40: Adtech 2018 – impressions from the sell side

Adtech 2018 - impressions from the sell side panel

Moderated by Ronan Shields, Ad Tech Reporter, Adweek. This panel will address the issues and opportunities facing premium publishers in 2018. From the rise of initiatives such as ITP from Safari restricting ad opportunities on mWeb, right through to the complex landscape of unified yield management, also known as header bidding. The panel will discuss life post-GDPR, the rise of 2nd party data marketplaces, and why publisher coalitions are so hot right now. 

Speakers:

  • Dora Michail, MD Digital Telegraph
  • Steph Miller, Head of Sales & Marketing Services, Zoopla
  • Danny Spears, Programmatic Director, The Guardian
  • Lauren Dick – Head of Emerging Platforms, Mail Online
09:45 – 10:15: Identity, the quest for an open & alternative ID continues

Identity, the quest for an open & alternative ID continues panel

Moderated by Paul Gubbins, Programmatic Lead, Unruly. This panel looks at where we are as an industry in the quest for an alternative and open ID. They will challenge the idea that life post-cookie will challenge visibility for both buyers and sellers, unless they operate within walled gardens. The panel will also explore ID portability, and how initiatives from bodies such as the IAB Tech Lab will tackle areas of concern such as digital ID management, privacy legislation and the explosive growth of connected devices.

Speakers:

  • Nigel Gilbert – Chief Market Strategist, AppNexus EMEA, A Xandr Company
  • Shane Shevlin – SVP Strategic Development, IPONWEB
  • Matt Simpson – Joint CEO Investment Omnicom
  • Morwenna Beales, VP ID5
10:35 – 11:05: Exchanging views, thoughts from the buy side

Exchanging views, thoughts from the buy side panel

Moderated by Vincent Flood, Editor, Video Ad News. This panel will discuss in detail the ever-changing programmatic landscape and look at best practice examples from those on the buy side. it will address topics such as auction mechanics like bid caching and shading, releases such as ITP from Safari, and the emergence of new transaction models such as programmatic guaranteed. This panel will also discuss preferences for 1st versus 2nd price auctions, and how initiatives such as ads.txt have changed the way traders buy.

Speakers:

  • Matt Bushby, Head of Programmatic, MediaCom
  • Charlie Glyn – Head of Programmatic, Havas Media Group
  • Simon Harris – Head of Programmatic, Activation Dentsu Aegis
  • Emily Macdonald – SVP Precision EMEA, Publicis Media
11:10 – 11:40: Why emotions matter in an age of automated advertising

Why emotions matter in an age of automated advertising panel

Moderated by James Chandler – CMO, IAB. This panel will focus on how marketers are showing an increasing appetite to understand the connection between consumer emotions and digital advertising.

Post-GDPR, and pre full roll out of the CCPA, dependencies on 3rd party data sets have been wound down. Marketers and agencies are now looking for signals familiar from traditional advertising buys, but that are often overlooked in programmatic. Featuring pioneering insight from UnrulyEQ, this panel will discuss the rise of AI and what using traditional targeting methods via modern programmatic technology actually means for those on both the buy and sell sides.

Speakers:

  • Liam Brennan, Global Director of Innovation, MediaCom
  • Becky Waring, VP Insight, UnrulyEQ
  • Anna Forbes, UK general Manager, The Trade desk

11:40 – 12:00: Closing remarks and refreshments

Trust Talks: The Great Programmatic Debate will be live streaming via the Unruly Facebook page from 9-12 on Tuesday 5th November!

Click here to find out more about this event.

In the past a sudden fall in the temperature, a flutter of snow, or the sound of jingle bells would indicate that Christmas was on it’s way. These days it’s marked by the Christmas ads that begin to appear around the beginning of November.

Our UnrulyEQ team have been hard at work trying to decipher which emotions make Christmas ads so moving and memorable. If you think back to Christmas ads gone by I’m sure a whole host of images and emotions pop into your head, from the Coca Cola truck and a man in the moon, to a clumsy cat and a dancing carrot.

The team have looked at some of the most popular festive ads from the past three years to find out what emotions they evoked, and what issues they sought to address.

The overall emotional profile of Christmas

Graph showing overall emotions of Christmas ads

Overall, from our analysis of ads from 2015, 2016 and 2017, we can see that Christmas ads have a clear trend of evoking strong happiness and warmth, followed by inspiration and nostalgia.

It’s no surprise that companies have decided to evoke these emotions from their ads, as for most, of us they come hand in hand with this time of year! We experience feelings of happiness and warmth when thinking about spending time with loved ones. We also experience nostalgia when we think back to what makes Christmas special to us. Normally this is a something we do every year like watching our favourite festive film, coming together to cook a Christmas meal, or playing that board game that only materialises on Christmas day and then disappears for the rest of the year!

The emotional profile of 2015 falls neatly in line with this trend that Christmas ads follow, evoking strong emotions of happiness and warmth, followed by good inspiration, nostalgia, amazement, pride and sadness. This was the year of John Lewis’ famous ‘Man On The Moon’ ad, and the year that Sainsburys brought the children’s book character Mog the cat to life.

The following year saw the strongest emotional response, outperforming across the main Christmas related emotions. This year also saw ads evoke stronger feelings of pride, sadness and hilarity than other years. Think John Lewis’ ‘Buster The Boxer’, M&S’s Mrs Claus, and Heathrow Airport’s ‘Coming Home’ ads.

Last year had a similar emotional profile to 2015, although evoked slightly lower sadness and inspiration but higher hilarity. This year saw McDonald’s launch their ‘Carrot Stick’ campaign, and BBC One created an animated ad bringing a girl and her father together over a Christmas performance.

Top 5 most emotional ads of Christmas

Strongest emotions in the top 5 Christmas ads

The most emotional Christmas ads by year

The common thread running through these three ads is that of familiarity. All of them offer a concept that is familiar to the viewers which results in a low likelihood for confusion and allows for an amplified emotional effect amongst viewers.

Another noticeable theme across these top Christmas ads is that of togetherness and inclusion. All three ads managed to capture the spirit of Christmas in different ways.

Looking at intense emotional response in 3 Christmas ads

  • ‘Man On The Moon’ focused on loneliness around Christmas and the importance of making everyone feel like they matter, regardless of age.
  • ‘Buster The Boxer’ offers a stronger focus on inclusion, which is a common interest which can unite even the most natural enemies.
  • ‘Supporting Act’ showcases the act of being present for one another when it really matters.

Both ‘Man On The Moon’ and ‘Supporting Act’ shed light on important topics of today and put a new spin on the traditional Christmas theme of happiness and warmth. On the other hand, ‘Buster The Boxer’ played on the genuine and childlike happiness that Christmas evokes in many of us, while adding a humorous twist.

The strongest emotions in the top 5

Looking at the top ads from 2015, 2016 and 2017, warmth and happiness were the top two emotions that were evoked. However we were surprised to find that the third strongest emotion was different for each ad.

Breaking down emotions in the 3 top Christmas ads

In EDEKA’s ‘Heimkommen’ ad there was a strong focus on loneliness which evoked considerable sadness amongst viewers. The ad saw a strong emotional response with some polarising views due to the portrayal of loneliness showing the faking his death to bring his relatives together.

John Lewis’ ‘Buster The Boxer’ ad evoked considerable amazement, this was likely due to the highly relatable concept of the simple joy of a trampoline. Viewers were likely further amazed by how well the ad captured the genuine happiness expressed by not only the dog but all the animals playing on the trampoline. This original concept resulted in viewers being surprised by the ad, which likely fuelled the noticeable amazement.

During Barbour’s ‘Snowman’ ad viewers felt highly nostalgic. This was likely due to basing the ad on the famous animation from the 1980s and its sequel from 2012; this allowed for capturing a wider audience that would relate with the concept. The ad further offered a strong nostalgic link due to using the same style of animation as the story it is building on.

Key Takeaways
  • The top 5 most emotional Christmas ads by year shows that the emotional profile of Christmas is strongly led by happiness and warmth
  • The most emotional ad by year showed a common thread of familiarity with a noticeable theme of togetherness and inclusion whilst each offering their individual spin on the theme and hence standing out against the crowd
  • These ads have also shown that addressing important and timely issues or playing on the pure and innocent happiness of Christmas works to evoke an intense emotional response
  • The third strongest emotion by year was the evident differentiator between 2015, 2016 and 2017, offering strong sadness, amazement and nostalgia respectively
  • Aligning with a somewhat different emotional profile allowed brands to stand out by offering a different angle to portraying Christmas

To download the full Christmas Insights slide deck head here.

Find out how UnrulyEQ can help improve the success of your ads by understanding the emotional, behavioural and cultural characteristics that supercharge your campaign.

We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again: strong emotions are key to the success of an online video.

Brands and content creators love to toy with our feelings. They like to pump you up with pulse-racing action, make you wistful for your youth before then compelling you to drop everything and travel the globe. Online adverts are an emotional rollercoaster at the best of times.

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